Hans Christian Andersen

Hans Christian Andersen was a Danish author most famous for his short stories. He was born in Odense, Denmark in 1805. His family was poor, and after the death of his father in 1816, Andersen moved to Copenhagen to pursue an acting career.

 

Unable to break into the Copenhagen acting scene, Andersen instead submitted several plays to the Royal Theater, all of which were turned down, but attracted the attention of Jonas Collin, the financial director of the theater, who then after became Andersen’s educational patron.


 

 

Andersen was sent to grammar school in Slagelse, where he had a difficult time because of the harshness of the headmaster, who forbade Andersen to write any fiction, and constantly reminded him of his place as a person from the lower class. He spent fours years at the grammar school, until his patron pulled him out and brought him back to Copenhagen.

 

Andersen never married, but it has been rumored that he desired relationship with Collin’s son Edvard, but it was never fulfilled.

 

Andersen was able to attend Copenhagen University because of his patron, and found his first commercial success while at university, with his book A Walking Tour from Holmen Canal to the Eastern Point of Anger.

 

The Improvisatore brought Andersen’s first international success in writing in 1835. He wrote many plays and short story collections after.

 

Andersen died in 1875 from liver cancer. He is buried in Copenhagen.

 

Click Here for a review of Hans Christian Andersen’s A Christmas Greeting

Click Here for a review of Hans Christian Andersen’s The Old House


Click Here for a review of Hans Christian Andersen’s A Drop of Water


Click Here for a review of Hans Christian Andersen’s The Happy Family


Click Here for a review of Hans Christian Andersen’s Story of a Mother


Click Here for a letter from Hans Christian Andersen to Charles Dickens

 

Merriman, C. D. Onlineliterature.com. Jalic Inc. 2006. Web. 4 Jan. 2011. http://www.online-literature.com/hans_christian_andersen/.

Hans Christian …

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